Monday Menagerie, recent
Leave a Comment

Monday Menagerie #40

I am fascinated by Hillary Clinton and all of the women that I am sharing in this week’s Monday Menagerie. We are in an incredible time in history.  Although it’s a somewhat scary, often depressing and morally challenging time, it is also THE time to be a woman. The sky and beyond are the limit (finally) and thanks to Hillary and all of the women who had courage, determination, and said “I will not be discriminated against because of my gender,” we have a LOT to look forward to. Soon we WILL see a woman’s face on American currency and as the leader of the free world–major milestones that give me hope and reasons to smile. Happy Monday and happy time to be alive!


 

via indystar.com

via indystar.com

P O L I T I C S : PICTURES OF WOMEN WHO BROKE POLITICAL GLASS CEILINGS

Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838-1927), the first woman to run for president in 1872

Suffragist and Pacifist Jeanette Rankin (1880-1973), the first woman elected to congress. Upon her election in 1916 she reportedly said, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.”

Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005), the first African American woman to be elected to Congress in 1968.


via quoteinsta.com

via quoteinsta.com

M E D I C I N E : ELIZABETH BLACKWELL – FIRST WOMAN PHYSICIAN IN THE US.

Thank goodness for this “practical joke” and her determination to realize her dream at any cost.

“Elizabeth Blackwell was rejected by all the leading schools to which she applied, and almost all the other schools as well. When her application arrived at Geneva Medical College at Geneva, New York, the administration asked the students to decide whether to admit her or not. The students, reportedly believing it to be only a practical joke, endorsed her admission.”

 


 

via huffpost.com

via huffpost.com

A V I A T I O N : WHY AMELIA EARHART WAS SUCH A BIG DEAL

Oh I have been enamoured by Amelia Earhart since high school. I don’t know what drew me to her…oh, wait, yes I do…her amazing courage, her mysterious death doing what she loved and this super cool, no nonsense attitude that made her super stunning and strong.

“Amelia was the best. She did so many amazing things with her endless appetite for adventure, and had so much swag that they probably had to wipe it off of her propellers every time she landed.”

Truly amazing!

 


 

via tumblr.com

via tumblr.com

L E A D E R S H I P : WILMA MANKILLER

I regret to say that I only heard of Wilma Mankiller when I started to become interested and involved in Women on 20’s and she was one of the candidates. Her life and her work were incredible and she was committed to setting an example for young girls everywhere and empowered them to be leaders.

“After learning of Mankiller’s passing in 2010, President Barack Obama issued a statement about legendary Cherokee chief: “As the Cherokee Nation’s first female chief, she transformed the nation-to-nation relationship between the Cherokee Nation and the federal government, and served as an inspiration to women in Indian Country and across America,” he stated. “Her legacy will continue to encourage and motivate all who carry on her work.””

 


 

via azquotes.com

via azquotes.com

W O M E N ‘S  S U F F R A G E : SUSAN B. ANTHONY

What a firecracker! How amazing would it have been to sit in a room with Susan B. Anthony? Her energy, her grit, her “tell it like it is” attitude (this is who I would listen to rather than the person some Americans say the same thing about today :))

“Ignoring opposition and abuse, Anthony traveled, lectured, and canvassed across the nation for the vote. She also campaigned for the abolition of slavery, the right for women to own their own property and retain their earnings, and she advocated for women’s labor organizations. In 1900, Anthony persuaded the University of Rochester to admit women.”

 


 

via quotesgram.com

via quotesgram.com

C I V I L  R I G H T S: ROSA PARKS – AN INTERVIEW

I was so happy to find this great interview with Rosa Parks, to hear the story in her words is so inspiring.

“Rosa Parks: I don’t remember feeling that anger, but I did feel determined to take this as an opportunity to let it be known that I did not want to be treated in that manner and that people have endured it far too long. However, I did not have at the moment of my arrest any idea of how the people would react.”

 


 

via quotesgram.com

via quotesgram.com

A B O L I T I O N I S T  M O V E M E N T : HARRIET TUBMAN

The woman who WILL be on the $20 bill…YAY!

“Using the Underground Railroad, Tubman traveled almost 90 miles to freedom. She later said, “When I found I had crossed that line, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven.””

I mean come on…can what we have struggled with or taken on in our lives even come close to what this woman endured or what she woke up every morning fighting for? Wow. Incredible! Thank you, Harriet Tubman. Thank you so much.


Be Natural Trailer from Be Natural on Vimeo.

T H E  A R T S : ALICE GUY-BLACHE

A documentary searching for Alice Guy-Blaché, who at 23 was the first female director, became a powerful figure in film, then vanished.  (Featured this video in a previous MM but it’s worth sharing again!)

 


 

via gma.yahoo.com

via gma.yahoo.com

O U R  F U T U R E: HILLARY CLINTON MAKES HISTORY

I’m with her.

 


 

 

M U S I C: H.H.A Beach

1897 – H.H.A. Beach’s “Gaelic Symphony” is the first symphony by a woman performed in the United States, and possibly the world.

 

 


Featured image (at top):  vintage photo

All reviews written and opinions expressed are the author’s own. “Shared by [name]” – Refers to the person who shared the link to the original piece featured here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s